Fair pay to play shaking up NCAA

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EAST LANSING, MI. (WILX) -- Student athletes in California are able to make money off their own image thanks to the "Fair Pay to Play" act signed by Governor Gavin Newsome on Monday.

Athletes and coaches in Michigan are telling NEWS 10 that the Fair Pay to Play act is a good thing.

The biggest issue is how to make sure athletes get the same amount of money.

Dwane Casey, Pistons Head Coach said, "I like the idea. I just don't know if you can have one player make X amount of money and another player doesn't do that just because he's not as popular."

Mark Dantonio, MSU Football Head Coach said, "There becomes a separation, and sometimes when there becomes a separation - it may not be good. I think there needs to be a halfway point...something that's equitable for everybody involved."

And once the law goes into effect, colleges in California cannot punish their athletes for making money off their identity.

If they want to make a few bucks signing autographs, they can do it without being suspended.

Dantonio said, "Let's get something that's fair and balanced across the board, men and women in all sports."

Some athletes of the mindset that the rule changes nothing.

Darrell Stewart, MSU's wide receiver said, "I'm just here to play football. I know the aspect of not getting paid for your name but that's what we signed up for."

Graham Filler is the State Representative for District 93.

He said, "There's a lot of unanswered questions, but I think it's a good conversation when it comes to - are we fairly taking care of athletes who make all the money for these schools?"

But there's a chance other states could follow suit.

The NCAA has not been shy about opposition to the bill, saying it would erase the critical distinction between college and professional athletes.

However, former MSU Spartan and current NBA player, Draymond Green is pushing back against the organization and supporting the bill.

"I think this is a huge step in the right direction. It's kind of ironic to me that the NCAA would continue to fight this, and no one's taking money out of their pocket directly," said Green.

"It's not taking money out of their ticket sales, it's not taking money out of the team sponsorships or university sponsorships that they're selling, yet the dictatorship wants to continue by the same system that's been broken for several years."

If the law survives expected legal battles, it goes into effect in 2023.

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