Governor Whitmer concerned about strike impact

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LANSING, MI. (AP) - Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer says she’s concerned about the growing impact of the United Auto Workers union’s strike against General Motors.

Gov. Whitmer visited workers on the picket lines at a GM plant near the state capital of Lansing Monday as the strike entered its fourth week.

She says it’s important for both sides to find common ground as quickly as possible.

Gov. Whitmer is concerned about the state’s economy as the strike impact spreads to the automobile supply chain.

The strike by 49,000 workers began Sept. 16 halted production at GM’s U.S. factories.

On Monday, GM shut down V8 engine and continuously variable transmission assembly lines at its Ramos Arizpe plant in Mexico, idling about 415 workers.

Earlier the company closed two assembly plants in Mexico and Canada due shortages of parts.

Earlier that day, it was reported that contract talks aimed at ending the strike by the United Auto Workers against General Motors were taking a turn for the worse, hitting a big snag over product commitments for U.S. factories.

A new letter from UAW Vice President Terry Dittes to workers casts doubt on whether there will be a quick settlement in the contract dispute crippling GM’s factories.

Dittes’ letter says the union presented a proposal to the company Saturday.

He said GM responded Sunday morning by reverting back to an offer that had been rejected and made few changes.

Normally in contract talks, the union bargains for commitments from the company to build new vehicles, engines, transmissions and other items at U.S. factories represented by the union.

"It did nothing to provide job security during the term of this agreement," Dittes wrote. "We, in this union, could not be more disappointed with General Motors who refuse to recognize the experience and talent of our membership."

In a statement, GM said it continues to negotiate in good faith "with very good proposals that benefit employees today and builds a stronger future for all of us."

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