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Find an injured animal? Here’s how Michiganders can help

Find an injured animal? Here’s how Michiganders can help
Published: Apr. 22, 2022 at 10:14 PM EDT|Updated: Apr. 22, 2022 at 11:57 PM EDT
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EATON RAPIDS, Mich. (WILX) - As the weather gets warmer, you may want to take a stroll down one of Mid-Michigan’s trails and check out the wildlife.

That means you might run into an injured animal. What do you do if you’re in that situation?

Louise Sagaert, the director of Wildside Rehabilitation and Education Center, is urging people to be conscious of their surroundings in case there are animals in need of help.

In most cases, Sagaert said it’s best to stay away from the animal. If you see a fawn or baby bunnies by themselves, leave them alone -- this is normal.

However, if you happen to see a situation involving those animals when they’re in distress, Sagaert has some advice.

“Baby mammals -- like baby squirrels, baby bunnies -- need to be kept very warm,” Sagaert said. “Anything that is naked or has a little bit of fur needs to be kept very warm.”

Most importantly, do not try and research online what to do, but call the experts.

“Don’t try and look up on the internet what to do. There’s as much bad information as good information on the internet,” Sagaert said. “Getting some real good advice from a wildlife rehabilitator is the best thing.”

While wild animals can be super cute, they don’t make good pets and it’s illegal.

“Even if you raise them from babies, they become adult animals and they always have those wild instincts,” Sagaert said. “Again, the best thing is that the animal gets to a wildlife rehabilitator to either be raised because it’s orphaned, or helped because it’s injured or sick.”

There are a number of wildlife rescues in Michigan. You can always call one and ask questions if you’re not sure what to do.

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