Teacher Tenure Laws

By: AP
By: AP

The Republican-controlled Michigan House is poised to vote on bills that would change the tenure system for teachers in the state.
Proposals could come up for votes Thursday afternoon. Sponsors of the legislation say it's aimed at removing ineffective teachers from the classroom unless their performance improves.
Current Michigan law places teachers on probation for their first four full school years. The House proposal would lengthen the probationary period to five years.
The proposal would allow for teachers who are on probation to be dismissed at any time. Teachers would have to be rated as "effective" or better on their three most recent performance evaluations to get off probation.
Tenured teachers could be placed back on probation if they are rated as ineffective. Continued poor ratings would result in dismissal.


You must be logged in to post comments.

Username:
Password (case sensitive):
Remember Me:

Read Comments

Comments are posted from viewers like you and do not always reflect the views of this station.
  • by educationobserver Location: Lansing on Jun 9, 2011 at 04:02 PM
    Current, or should I say previous Tenure Laws, prevented "bad" teachers staying in the classroom. The breakdown occurs when building and district administrators are too inexperienced, or too inept to deal with inadequate teachers. It's just like socially promoting a student...the years go by and nothing is done to resolve the root problem. Building Administrators are going to need training, LOTS of training, to enforce this tenure law. Who is going to pay for that? Another unfunded mandate on education?? Who is going to develop the metrics for evaluating good teachers? Our politicians who are very far removed from the classroom? I think not.
  • by Adam Location: Lansing, MI on Jun 9, 2011 at 12:20 PM
    The tenure law doesn't just protect lazy teachers. Look at any teacher contract and there are very clear procedures in place for firing a teacher with tenure. In a nutshell, our teacher contract states that administration needs to be able to show documentation of poor performance to fire a teacher. If the administration doesn't do the observations in the first place--then yes--it's hard to get rid of a teacher. My last three evaluations never even happened. Our administrator would call me down, asked me if I minded if he just used an old observation (which of course I didn't because it was a very good one), and changed the date. This isn't a problem with the tenure law--the procedures are very clear and not difficult. The problem in getting rid of a teacher with tenure comes when the procedures aren't followed.
  • by Anonymous on Jun 9, 2011 at 10:41 AM
    Some of the best places that I have worked at did not have the unions trying to protect the workers. Every employee there knew that the bosses were there for them and that if they gave their all, it would was for the better.
  • by lansing623 on Jun 9, 2011 at 07:09 AM
    It's about time, now maybe our children will get the education that they are entitled to by law. 'NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND'.
  • by Ricardo Location: Lansing on Jun 9, 2011 at 03:00 AM
    It's about time this issue gets attention. There are many very good teachers, but like any group, there are some "slackers" that hide and just collect a paycheck due to being protected by this tenure law. Dismiss them and hire someone that cares about educating the children instead of bleeding the taxpayers dry for not doing their job. Thank you. Ricardo
    • reply
      by Adam on Jun 9, 2011 at 12:19 PM in reply to Ricardo
      The tenure law doesn't just protect lazy teachers. Look at any teacher contract and there are very clear procedures in place for firing a teacher with tenure. In a nutshell, our teacher contract states that administration needs to be able to show documentation of poor performance to fire a teacher. If the administration doesn't do the observations in the first place--then yes--it's hard to get rid of a teacher. My last three evaluations never even happened. Our administrator would call me down, asked me if I minded if he just used an old observation (which of course I didn't because it was a very good one), and changed the date. This isn't a problem with the tenure law--the procedures are very clear and not difficult. The problem in getting rid of a teacher with tenure comes when the procedures aren't followed.
    • reply
      by Anonymous on Jun 9, 2011 at 02:20 PM in reply to Ricardo
      What people don't talk about is how school officials might fire good experienced teachers, just to hire cheaper new teachers to balance the books.
WILX 500 American Road Lansing, MI 48911 517-393-0110
Copyright © 2002-2016 - Designed by Gray Digital Media - Powered by Clickability 123532049 - wilx.com/a?a=123532049
Gray Television, Inc.