Nassar sentenced to 40 - 125 years in Eaton County

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Judge Cunningham in Eaton County sentenced Larry Nassar, 54, to 40 to 125 years in prison for seven counts of felony criminal sexual conduct int he first degree.

Nassar is already serving 60 years in federal prison on child pornography charges. He was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in Ingham County, and that sentence would be concurrent with the Eaton County sentence.

The Eaton County sentence was handed down after two days of victim impact statements. 48 new survivors shared their statements either in person, via video, or had it read on their behalf. 12 survivors who also shared statements in Ingham County.

Nassar had pleaded guilty to three felony counts of sexual conduct int he first degree in Ingham County. He pleaded guilty to three felony counts of criminal sexual conduct int he first degree in Eaton County as well.

Assistant Attorneys General Angela Povilaitis was the lead prosecutor on the case, and made closing statements on Monday morning. "We must all start by believing victims when they tell, regardless of who the adult is."

Povilaitis highlighted two thing she says she took away from this sentencing hearing. "We must stop blaming, stop blaming victims, stop blaming parents. And second we must transform this pain, and this anger, and this hurt into something good. Victim shaming has to stop. It is so hard for these victims. What can't be seen from the bench where you sit, or the jury box where the media sits, is just how hard it is and was for many." She says only dark-hearted people would attack the victims.

Povilaitis says that above all, we are taught to trust doctors. "It could have happened to any parent." She says Nassar fooled parents who were police officers, doctors, engineers. "Regardless of their profession, he fooled them all." She has a message to the parents of the survivors, "please, try to let your guilt go. Your children to not blame you. You are good parents. You're great parents. You believed your daughters, you stand with them, you support them. You will be there to comfort them, to wipe their tears." She continues, "to show them they are not broken. Because they are not broken."

"The blame, and the shame belong on one person. The defendant." She wants the survivors, and parents, to "transform" their pain and anger constructively. "Cast the shame and guilt aside, and cast it where it belongs - on him." She points to Nassar.

"Something good must come from this." She says it might be hard to believe, but some good has come from this already. "Young women have been, and are empowered to stand up for themselves. And now we can be sure that a group of determined women can transform into advocates of change."

"A criminal sentencing, must protect, punish, and deter," she asks the judge to do all three. Requesting the judge to sentence Nassar to 40 years to 125 years in prison.

Nassar made a short statement before sentencing. "The words expressed by everyone that has spoken, including the parents, have impacted me to my innermost core."

Judge Cunningham says she is not convinced that Nassar understands that what he has done is wrong. "Clearly you are in denial, you don't get it. And I do not believe that there is a likelihood that you could be reformed."

"You took an oath to do no harm - and you harmed over 256 women." She says the sentence, in this case, must send a message.

News 10's Clayton Cummins was tweeting live from the courtroom. (See his tweets below or follow them here: @ClaytonCummins)